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German Embassy visit to MSMS

Stephan Jacobi, a representative from the German Embassy in Washington, DC, visited the Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science on Friday, November 9th to meet with Lori Pierce, MSMS Instructor of French, German, and Latin, and Laura Justus, German teaching intern.

Pierce said, “we discussed how the German government and embassy can and do support the teaching of German at MSMS.”

Morgan Emokpae, an emissary at MSMS, took him on a tour of the campus where he saw academic buildings, dormitories and much more.

On Thursday evening, November 8th, at Mississippi State University, he hosted a panel discussion on the history and current status of immigration and refugees in Germany. Justus was included on that panel because of her work with refugees in her home city of Göttingen, Germany before coming to the US. Several MSMS students attended the panel and were involved in the discussions.

Jacobi has served as assistant to the spokesman of interior policy for the Christian Democratic Parliamentary Group in the German Bundestag, the Federal German Government as a lawyer and senior government official, and is currently the liaison officer for the German Ministry of the Interior. He is also a Major (res.) in the German Army. 

The Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science is Mississippi’s only public, residential high school specifically designed to meet the needs of the state’s most academically gifted and talented students. MSMS is ranked the no. 6 best public high school in the nation and the faculty was ranked no. 1 as the best public high school teachers in the nation by Niche.

For more information, please visit themsms.org.

Janie ShieldsComment
Bells are Ringing... MSMS Students serve as Salvation Army Bell ringers

On Friday, Nov. 30, ten MSMS students—seniors Edith Marie Green, Indu Nandula, and Ashely Nguyen and juniors Ryley Fallon, David Barber, Simeon Gates, Ayden Dusek, Gina Nguyen, Kaitlyn Steil, and Catherine Boltz—volunteered at the Columbus Walmart and Kroger as bellringers to raise money for the Salvation Army. Students worked diligently from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., some donning Santa hats in the Christmas spirit.

The annual event was sponsored this year by Ms. Latoya Bledsoe, Goen Hall Director and a large support of service-related activities at MSMS. “For service to be one of the pillars of MSMS, I am an advocate for giving back and providing opportunities for our students to volunteer. It doesn't cost a thing to serve.”

"It felt great to be giving back," volunteer Indu Nandula expressed. "At one point we were singing Christmas carols... and one woman came and sang with us. That encounter alone made the whole event so worth it... and very rewarding."

Volunteers were able to receive wellness credit hours for participating. On Dec. 7, Ms. Bledsoe is planning to take another group of 17 MSMS students to raise money by bellringing at the local grocery stores again.

The Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science is Mississippi’s only public, residential high school specifically designed to meet the needs of the state’s most academically gifted and talented students. MSMS is ranked the no. 6 best public high school in the nation and the faculty was ranked no. 1 as the best public high school teachers in the nation by Niche.

For more information, please visit themsms.org.

By: Victoria Gong, MSMS Senior
MSMS Emissary 2018

Janie ShieldsComment
MSMS Students Recognized by the Mississippi Scholastic Press Association in the Annual "Best of Mississippi Literary Magazine Awards."

Victoria Gong, Lilian Li, Michelle Luo, Helen Peng, current students at the Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science, were recently honored at the Mississippi Scholastic Press Association’s statewide high school journalism convention in Hattiesburg with Best of Mississippi Scholastic Journalism Awards for their work on the literary magazine, Southern Voices. 2018 graduates, Kamal Bhalla, Aidan Dunkelburg, and Barrie Wright were also honored.

“Having our MSMS students' writing and art recognized by the Mississippi Scholastic Press Association brings honor to the students, to their families, and to our school.  I know the time and effort the students spend in perfecting their work; I'm proud for them--and proud of them,” said Emma Richardson, creative writing instructor at MSMS.

The MSPA was founded in 1947 to help student journalists statewide improve their journalistic and communication skills. MSPA has over 100 member publications ranging from yearbooks, newspapers, literary magazines and broadcasts.

"MSMS continues to stand out among its peer institutions as a beacon of student expression and excellence. When we talk at the state level about empowering students to tell their own stories and the stories of others, theirs is that type program," said R.J. Morgan, MSPA Director.

Works of art were judged based on theme and cover, overall design, fiction content, non-fiction content, and visual content. The Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science took home 11 awards.

Victoria Gong, of Vicksburg, was a finalist in the short fiction category for Shaving Cream, non-fiction category for Basketball, and poem category for Leather.

Helen Peng, of Starkville, was a finalist in the short fiction category for Saigon.

Lilian Le, of Bay St. Louis, was a finalist for a hand drawn illustration.

Michelle Luo, of New Albany, was a finalist in the short fiction category for In the Snow and non-fiction category for Steamed Fish.

Kamal Bhalla, of Clinton, was a finalist in the photography category.

Aidan Dunkelberg, of Columbus, was the overall winner in the poem category for Catfish Alley.

Sarah Swiderski, of Starkville, was a finalist in the non-fiction category for Callused.

Barrie Wright, of Cleveland, was a finalist for a hand drawn illustration.

“Our MSMS students are known for their prowess in STEM disciplines, but they're also talented in writing and the fine arts; it's wonderful for them to have this kind of acknowledgement, too,” added Richardson.

The Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science is Mississippi’s only public, residential high school specifically designed to meet the needs of the state’s most academically gifted and talented students. MSMS is ranked the no. 6 best public high school in the nation and the faculty was ranked no. 1 as the best public high school teachers in the nation by Niche.

For more information, please visit themsms.org.

Janie ShieldsComment
MSMS Hosts Annual Science Carnival

For well over twenty years, the Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science (MSMS) has hosted an annual Science Carnival at Pohl Gymnasium for local second and third grade students across Lowndes, Oktibbeha, and Clay counties to encourage an early interest in science education. This year also included Pickens County.

This year, over 800 elementary school students participated in the interactive, science-oriented carnival. Current juniors and seniors at MSMS performed a host of different scientific demonstrations to the delight of the elementary school students watching. While the specific exhibits change slightly from year to year, the focus remains on key scientific principles such as inertia, electricity, the metrics system, properties of water, and color and light manipulation.

In addition to exciting exhibits and hands-on workshops for students, teachers received a guidebook that details inexpensive ways to incorporate science-based learning into their classroom instruction. The guidebook contains experiment ideas, sample lesson plans, and science instruction best practices.

Every current MSMS student plays an important role in the carnival. Some students serve as presenters for specific exhibits, while others serve as guides and greeters. Still others volunteer to assist with event setup and teardown. Not only is the Science Carnival a great way for MSMS students to share their love of science with local students, it is also an invaluable lesson for them on the importance of community activism.

Janie ShieldsComment
Searching for Lost Heroes

On Friday, October 12th, Julie Heintz’s University US History, University Western Civilization, and World War II students learned about remote sensing technologies and viewed the field work on a project to attempt to locate unmarked graves of Union soldiers buried in Columbus, Mississippi's', Friendship  Cemetery during the Civil War.  The Center for Archaeological Research at the University of Mississippi employed remote sensing including ground penetrating radar to search for the graves.

Those unmarked Friendship Cemetery graves of up to 10 soldiers and the graves of 32 other Union soldiers whose remains were moved to Corinth National Cemetery in 1867 and of over 2,100 Confederate soldiers were decorated with flowers by Columbus ladies on April 25, 1866. Their act of reconciliation received extensive national praise, inspired the poem "The Blue and the Gray" and was an event that led to the creation of Memorial Day. Their act of compassion was recognized by President Obama in his 2010 Memorial Day Address. The location of these Union soldier's graves was last referred to in 1919 and all that is now known of their location is that it was in the south west corner of the 1865 cemetery grounds. The location of these soldiers graves indicate they had probably served under General U. S. Grant and had died after the battle of Shiloh in 1862.

Through the use of non-invasive, remote sensing technologies,  archaeologists from the University of Mississippi attempted to locate the resting place of these American heroes whose graves played a central role in the origins of Memorial Day. 

This was a joint project of, the Center for Archaeological Research, University of Mississippi, the U S Grant Association and  U S Grant Presidential Library at Mississippi State University, and the Billups-Garth Foundation of Columbus, with assistance by the City of Columbus and the Columbus-Lowndes Convention and Visitors Bureau.

Janie ShieldsComment